Tag Archives: conservation

All in the Same Boat: Sustainable Large Object Collections – Date of new ABTEM Seminar announced!

Following the success of the ABTEM autumn seminar, we are pleased to be supporting the National Waterways Museum in running an additional meeting on 7th December 2016 at Ellesmere Port.

Using the Canal & River Trust boat collection as a case study the day will focus on the realities and challenges of managing large object collections for the long term. Caring for large, industrial and operational objects in museum collections presents unique challenges and none more than boats in water.

Although the focus of the meeting will naturally be on boat collections, the day will be of interest to anyone facing challenges of managing large and working objects. It will look at approaches to conservation and how to decide which route to take. It will also be applicable to anyone who has to deal with the over-enthusiastic collecting of previous curators, and approaches to reviewing and rationalising collections that have become unsustainable.

To find out more, and book a place, please visit: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/all-in-the-same-boat-sustainable-large-object-collections-tickets-29079402275

 

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ABTEM TO UNDERTAKE SCOPING WORK TO UPDATE MGC STANDARDS

Supported by Arts Council England (ACE) Subject Specialist Network (SSN) funding, ABTEM has recently commissioned museum consultant Rob Shorland-Ball to carry out a Scoping Study on the feasibility of developing and updating the MGC 1994 Standard 4: Standards in the Museum Care of Larger & Working Objects.

Many people will know, or have used these standards, which provided advice and information on the management and conservation of industrial, transport and engineering collections and despite being long out of print, they remain an important source of information. The original 1994 document was augmented by the 1997 ‘Larger & Working Objects: A Guide to their preservation and care’ also published by MGC also now not available in print. The Collections Trust published Larger & Working Objects: a guide to standards in their preservation and care in 2009 but that, too, is now out-of-date and neither it, nor MGC Standard 4, was very user-friendly for private collectors, preservers and operators of larger objects.

ABTEM is keen to obtain the views of as many people as possible and so are organising two open discussion meetings to gain further feedback. These are being held on:

  • Tuesday 19 May, Museum of Liverpool – afternoon 13.30 – 16.00
  • Wednesday 27 May, London Museum of Water & Steam – afternoon 13.30 – 16.00

All are welcome at these free events – if you would like to attend, please contact Rob Shorland-Ball for further details at:  robsb@wfmyork.demon.co.uk or by telephone on (01904) 632751

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AIM Member Workshops: An introduction to collections care

If you are an AIM member (and many ABTEM members are!) then these free workshops should be of interest.

AIM Blog for independent museums and heritage sites

Why don’t objects last for ever? Why does it matter where watercolours are displayed? Why is it necessary to wear gloves to handle objects? If you have ever wondered why collections care matters – or even what it is – then this is the workshop for you.

Workshop Tutor, Jane Thompson Webb, will show you what the main agents of decay are and how they can damage objects. You will also be offered a range of practical strategies to help ensure that your collections will be accessible now and in the future.

Each workshop runs from 10am – 4.30pm and delegate packs with useful conservation items and lunch/refreshments will be provided.

At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to spot the causes of damage in their own collections and introduce monitoring and/or mitigation strategies.

Taking part in collections care workshops is also a lot of fun and…

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Industrial Heritage training day – focusing on Health & Safety

Helmshore Mills Textile Museum

Thursday 3rd July
10:00 – 15:30
FREE

The Museums Development North West and the English Heritage-funded Industrial Heritage Support Officer are facilitating three events in 2014 to support industrial heritage museums and sites in the North West. Following on from the first day at Quarry Bank Mill, this second event in the series will focus on health and safety at industrial heritage sites. The day will introduce introductory training and information on health and safety issues on industrial heritage sites. The day also includes a site tour, the opportunity to network and discuss common issues, and to find out more about “Stepping Up”, the report into the review of textile machinery in the North West.

Booking details are available at: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/industrial-heritage-training-day-focusing-on-health-safety-tickets-11914531685

PRISM FUND FOR 2014-2015 NOW OPEN

The  PRISM Fund 2014-15 is now open for applications.The fund, which helps to support the acquisition and conservation of heritage objects from the fields of science, technology, industry and medicine,  was established in 1973 in response to the growing concern that technological change was resulting in the loss of much of Britain’s industrial heritage. It has since gone on to help hundreds of non-national museums and preservation groups in England and Wales acquire or conserve thousands of objects of industrial or scientific importance. 

Recent recipients of the fund include

–           The UCL Pathology Collection, who received a grant of almost £18K for the conservation of the Whittington Hospital Teaching Collection. The specimens that make up the Collection were gathered during post-mortem examinations, and are irreplaceable. Using PRISM funding, this important and previously undocumented collection of pathology samples, were conserved and re-housed, enabling the creation of physical and virtual teaching resources of macroscopic pathology specimens and matching slides.

–           CHAMP (Community Heritage Arts & Media Project) used a grant of £5,400 for the acquisition of a 1914 Elswick Hopper Motorcycle to be housed at Baysgarth House Museum. From the 1880’s until the late twentieth century Elswick Hopper of Barton upon Humber produced some of the most sought after cycles and motorcycles for distribution all over the world. This motorcycle represents the growth of a town through the local industry. It is rare to find an Elswick motorcycle which has survived in such excellent condition without major restoration work.

The PRISM Fund can offer grants of up to £20,000, or 90% of the total project costs. More details can be found here.

For more information, please get in touch, or contact the Designation and Prism team onprism@artscouncil.org.uk

http://www.artscouncil.org.uk/news/arts-council-news/arts-council-prism-fund-now-open-applications/