UK to host World Forum for Motor Museums event

The programme has been announced for the 2018 World Forum for Motor Museums which is being held at the British Motor Museum and Coventry Transport Museum between 3rd and 7th September.

More than 25 speakers from Australia, Belgium, Canada, Germany, New Zealand, the USA and the UK will be sharing their knowledge and expertise in a programme packed with content covering everything from income generation to vehicle conservation and much else. The four themes of resilience and sustainability, collections, engaging audiences and motor museums for the 21st century are illustrated with presentations and debate.

Full details of the programme are now available at wfmm2018.org including information about conference hotels and how to book a place.

The deadline for the ‘Early Bird’ rate for delegate fees  has been extended by one week to 6th July – details on the wfmm2018.org web site.

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Vacancy: Interim Editor – AIM Bulletin

Following the retirement of AIM’s long standing Bulletin Editor, Diana Zeuner, the Association is looking for an Editor to work with on an interim basis.

AIM are looking for a talented and creative Editor, preferably with knowledge of the museum and heritage sector, to work on a freelance basis to produce 5 issues, comprising the December 2018- August 2019 issues.

This would involve a start in early/mid September 2018 to begin work on the December 2018 issue

The Interim Editor will work closely with the AIM Staff team and Council members, in particular the Director, Emma Chaplin, and the Membership, Marketing and Projects Manager, Sassy Hicks, to maintain and develop consistent and complementary communications across digital and print.

For more information, please visit: https://www.aim-museums.co.uk/aim-vacancy-aim-bulletin-interim-editor/

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Revolution: Protecting and Understanding Industrial Archaeology

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APPG_IH_ReportMay18Industrial archaeology remains the gawky and introverted teenager of the archaeological world – at least in the UK. In Britain it often feels like industrial archaeology (and its sibling Post-medieval Archaeology) is in equal measure misunderstood, ignored or looked-down upon by the academic world. It’s been left to voluntary societies, the profession, local authorities and some of the statutory heritage bodies (supported by a handful of pioneering academics) to explore, save, and understand Britain’s globally important industrial archaeology.

The popular image is dominated by evocative and massive sites, from bottle kilns and coal mines to railway stations and textile mills. But that is to overlook the archaeology of consumption and mass production, from ceramics to fabrics, and to turn a blind eye to Britain’s controversial role in the slave trade, the development of empire, and globalisation, which are all bound up in the industrialisation process. There’s no doubting, though, that…

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Research Project: Does Accreditation Matter?

Sarah Chard-Cooper is working on a MA dissertation looking at the impact of the loss of the accreditation standard award for museums.  With cuts from central government, funding for councils in general and museums in particular is decreasing and new ways of finding the money to deliver their work are having to be found.  Several councils and university governing bodies in the last decade have looked at their heritage collections to help fill the holes in their budgets.

At times like this the Arts Council, and their predecessor the Museums Libraries and Archives Council (MLA), have withdrawn the museums accreditation.  However there has been no study to see what impact this loss has on a museum.  Sarah’s dissertation will look at the history of accreditation and, through questionnaires, will gauge the opinion of museum professionals on the scheme as a whole and on what difference it makes to them whether a museum has lost their accreditation or not.

Sarah has produced a short survey, accessible at: https://surveyhero.com/c/96680442/2b016ccb6a7bd253 and would be grateful for feedback.

Further information is available at: shcc1=student.le.ac.uk@surveyheromail.com

 

Interpreting Horse-Drawn Carriages in Museum Collections – New Guidance

Horse-drawn carriages are found in museum collections across the country. As moving objects in static displays they are often difficult to interpret. This new guide brings together best practice in the interpretation of carriages to help museums bring them to life.

The new guide was written by museum interpretation consultant Steve Slack, in collaboration with professionals from across the museum sector working with carriage collections. More information can be found at a new website that provides further information and resources.

This guide was commissioned by Staffordshire Archives and Heritage and funded by Arts Council England and complements ABTEM’s newly published Guidelines for the Care and Operation of Larger & Working Historic Objects. 

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Head of Collections and Interpretation Vacancy at Haynes International Motor Museum

News of a new post being created at the Haynes International Motor Museum at Sparkford:

“An exciting opportunity has arisen at the Haynes International Motor Museum for a Head of Collections and Interpretation to join the Senior Executive Team. The successful candidate will manage the Collections Department and lead the delivery of an ambitious and forward thinking strategy. The role’s responsibilities cover the full spectrum of collections focused activity including the day-to-day management of the collection, collections documentation, conservation, the delivery of education programmes and both temporary and longer term exhibitions & displays. The adoption of sector best practice will be at the heart of this work in preparation for an eventual Accreditation application.”

Salary: c£30-40,000

Further information about the vacancy can be found at: https://www.haynesmotormuseum.com/jobs/head-collections-and-interpretation

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CONSERVATION MANAGER VACANCY AT RAF MUSEUM

DETAILS OF A NEW POST AT THE RAF MUSEUM:

Conservation Manager

 

c£31,000 per annum


The Royal Air Force Museum is a National Museum that tells the story of the RAF through its people and collections.

The Conservation Manager role is an exciting new opportunity to lead a dedicated team within the Museum’s Collections Services department. This team will play a leading role in the continuing transformation of the RAF Museum as it marks the centenary of the Royal Air Force.

The post holder will manage the development and delivery of conservation projects and facilities at the Museum’s London site. In support of the Museum’s collections development and exhibition programmes they will manage a range of activities to ensure the preservation of collections whilst promoting wider public access to the RAF story and greater volunteer engagement.

A relevant conservation or engineering qualification or demonstrable experience in managing and preserving aircraft or other large industrial objects within a heritage, commercial or military environment are essential. The successful candidate will be able to demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of conservation or engineering standards.

The post will be based in Colindale, NW London. Some weekend and evening working and travel between Museum sites and to other institutions in the UK and overseas will be necessary.

 To apply:

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